A book club is a great way to get children to interact with each other, and not through a way of technology. By starting a book club for kids, not only will it increase their social skills, it’ll also encourage them to read in their free time whilst appreciating the story at the same time.

The importance of reading to, and with, children is huge as it can set them up for their adult life. Studies have shown that the benefits of reading to children are astounding, with children who are read to at an early age are more likely to succeed at school later in life. It is, however, important to make sure that children are following along to the words when you are reading to them, to ensure that they recognise words when they are able to read for themselves.

book stack

Photo by Kimberly Farmer 

If you’re thinking about how to start a book club for kids, here you’ll find tips and ideas for book club activities for kids from setting themes, organizing locations and a reward scheme.

You’ll also find ideas on how to run a book club for kids, with suggestions on names, how to communicate and ways to structure the sessions.


Kids’ Book Club Ideas

Are you wanting to start a book club but don’t know where to start? These kids’ book club ideas will help you on your way!

Decide on a Theme

Are the children interested in a particular genre of books? To begin with, get the children to read the books they already have an interest in, as this will get them to read the books. You can slowly introduce books that the children wouldn’t have read before, which will not only broaden their interests, but also their vocabulary.

Make Sure They Like Reading

This may seem obvious but ensuring the children in the book club enjoy reading and books will make the book club run a lot smoother. There’s nothing worse than someone feeling left out if they haven’t read the material for that session. If there’s a child that doesn’t like reading, perhaps this may be the perfect place for them. It may encourage non-willing children to read if they see their friends really enjoying a story.

Make the Books Accessible

Ensure that the books are accessible for everyone to read. Are they available at the local library? Does the school have access to them? If they’re not accessible to all the children, perhaps skip that book. Book clubs are meant to be fun and engaging, so don’t create added stress for the parents to try and find the books!

Get Creative with the Snacks

Snacks are a great way to really highlight a theme or book. Each child could bring a different snack that relates to the book they are reading for that week or session. Cupcakes are always a good idea – different flavors and icing colors are simple but can effectively portray a theme or character well.

cupckaes

Photo by Jennie Brown

Make Sure the Location is Accessible

To ensure every child that can make it to the book club is important. You can do this by either using one of the children’s homes on a week by week rotation or use the local library. This would work in your favor as both are free spaces, with the library being a host to all sorts of books and activities (it can also aid in inspiration for future books too!).

Create a Progress Reward Scheme

Rewards are a great way of keeping children on track for a particular goal. You could create a chart which shows which books have been read by each member, or to show how well they have read that week/book. This can be decided with all the parents to ensure it is fair with how quickly a member can read between sessions.


How to Run a Book Club

Now you’ve got the ideas on how to start a book club, you’ll now need to understand how to run a children’s book club.

Start with a Name

Book club names don’t have to be boring or simply ‘book club’. If you make the name exciting for the children attending, they’ll be more likely to want to go – book club doesn’t sound the most stimulating does it? Make a pun or play on words – this could be your first activity once the book club has formed. This way, the children will feel involved and will want to go if they created the name.

What’s the Purpose?

It’s all very well creating a book club for your children, but what’s the purpose? Is it to make friends? Is it to improve their reading skills at home? You need to figure out the purpose before book club starts, otherwise it won’t be beneficial for the children attending. 

Decide the Day it will Take Place Each Week

Deciding the day the book club will take place may seem obvious, but if you block out every session in bulk, there will be no confusion about when it will be. Also, this ensures a routine for the children to read a book ready to discuss on a Monday afternoon for example.

diary

Photo by Eric Rothermel 

How Will You Decide What Books to Read?

Do you want to follow the curriculum at school? If so, perhaps ask the childrens’ teacher to suggest a book that will compliment their studies. 

If you’re wanting for the children to read the books that they are interested in, why not get each child to write their suggestion down and put it in a hat. Each week, you could pick a new book from the suggestions, which ensures each child is happy that their book will be read at some point. If necessary, pick the books for each week at the first session, as this will give the parents plenty of time to buy/find the books. 

Structure Your Sessions

Structuring your sessions to have certain segments will not only make the book club run smoother, it will keep the children interested. 

Include segments as questions – particular questions may take a bit of time to answer for children, so this would work great. Examples would be:

  • What did you like about the book?
  • What would you change about the book?
  • Did the things you thought would happen, happen?
  • How did the book make you feel?

You could have a section towards the end of the session explaining what next week’s book is going to be, and they could discuss first impressions of the book. 

Don’t Worry if No One Read the Book

Instead of being disappointed that no one read the book, make the children talk about why they didn’t read the book. Was it too long? Were you not interested in it? These questions can lead to thoughtful discussions surrounding the book, and can be helpful in choosing future books.

If one child did read the book, let the others ask them questions about the book to see if they misjudged the book. The children who didn’t read the book may be inspired to read it afterwards if they hear their friends raving about it.

Decide How You’ll Communicate with Everyone

Communication when members have to reschedule or aren’t be able to attend is vital as depending on the size of your book club, missing members may mean that there isn’t enough to hold a meeting. Create a group chat on social media or Whatsapp so there’s a go-to place for parents to let others know if they are unable to make it that week. This can even be used to ask what book the children should be reading that week, or if they’re going to be late. Communication is key! 

Have a Movie Night

You might think that having a movie night defeats the object of a book club, but why not watch a film that has been adapted from a book that the group has read. It can be a reward for when the group has read 5 books. You can discuss the differences between the book and film, and if anyone preferred one over the other. This is another opportunity to be creative with snacks – is the book set in another country? Serve food from that country.

Visit the Location of the Book

This may be tricky if the book is set in another country, but if the story is set in London or somewhere nearby – plan a day trip! It may help the children visualize the surroundings when reading the book. This literary tube map of London will help you find the exact location of where many novels were set – Peter Pan and The BFG are some that are included.

It can also be linked in with the official book club meetings. You can ask the children whether visiting the location has changed their opinions on the book, or changed how they visualize it.